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Comparison: Ubuntu 12.04 vs Windows 8 [Review]

While Microsoft still hasn’t announced a release date for Windows 8, rumour has it that it’ll hit the shelves later this year. For the record, this will be the third straight time a major Windows version is launched close to the release of arguably the world’s most popular Linux distro – Ubuntu. Ubuntu and Canonical have cornea long way since their 7.04 Feisty Fawn release, which followed Microsoft’s Windows Vista. Back then. Canonical failed to capitalize on Vista’s universal rejection by its users. If reviews of the Windows 8 Consumer Preview are any indication, it’ll be a very cold winter for Microsoft. But, more importantly for the Linux community, does Ubuntu 12.04 have what it takes to position itself as a more usable alternative? The Ubuntu advantage It’s ironic how the one feature in recent Ubuntu releases that might have lost it some users will now work in its favor and attract new users by the bucket-load. We are, obviously, talking about Unity. Microsoft’s revolutionary Metro desktop is already facing criticism similar to that Canonical fielded when it Introduced Unity on the desktop. They listened, learned and they evolved. Furthermore, Windows 8 is a major departure from how Microsoft does desktops ֊ offline installations that could connect to each other. Now, with Windows 8, you have an online desktop designed to deliver the best of the cloud to your visually new desktop. It can do things in a way that no version of Windows ever could before. And we in the Linux world know what that means, right? Be it with KDE 4. Gnome 3, or Unity, suddenly introducing new paradigms and a dramatic new way of doing things displeases users. And while the changes might be new to Windows they have long been mainstays on the Linux desktop in general, and Ubuntu in particular. In this feature, we’ll...

Ubuntu 12.04 [Review]

Canonical has released Ubuntu 12.04. its fourth long-term support (LTS) release. Unlike standard Ubuntu releases, which come every six months and integrate majo՜ new technologies, the focus of any LTS release is to provide a secure, stable platform that businesses and demanding home users can rely on. Usually, this means an uninspiring release – few new features for users to play with, just lots of incremental improvements that everyore welcomes but nobody feels excited about. Ubuntu 12.04 is different, however, being the first LTS release tc feature Unity as its default desktop environment. Has Canonical delivered a desktop that users of the last LTS can confidently upgrade to. or will they be left cold when support for it is ended in April 2013. a year before the next one is released9 The answer is yes – mostly. Unity has become much faster and more reliable. In our testing, we found that it remained responsive even when running half-a-dozen applications and ripping a DVD. a taxing workload for most machines, suggesting that upgrading users have little to worry about in this regard. We also found that the Dash works well. It’s easy to access, whether by clicking the Ubuntu icon with the mouse or pressing the Windows key. and once you’re in it. the built-in search quickly finds the aoplications and files that you’re looking for. The new HUD feature does the same for most application menus, too. and if you’ve net used it. it’s worth trying. Best of all. animations and other visual cues have been refined to the pcint where they add to the experience of using Unity and make day-to-day computing a pleasurable experience -we actually looked forward to using it each day. A good example of this is the way that applications added to the launcher are always placed above the workspace switcher, removable devices and...

[Review] Gnome 3.4

Gnome 3.4, the third stable release in the 3.x series, is here. We couldn’t wait to try it out, since the last year has revealed Gnome 3 to be a desktop with a lot of potential, if a few rough edges. The first point to note is that Gnome 3.4 hasn’t set out to simply polish the rough edges, but has introduced a lot of welcome new features. The most significant is the work put in to the default web browser. Web (also known as Epiphany). Thanks to its Webkit backend, it feels fast and passes the Acid3 test v/ith flying colours. What’s more, a new SQLite backend for the address bar has made that part of the interface much quicker too. We think it’s sad that many users will never notice these improvements, as most distributions will replace Web with Firefox in their default selections. The most striking changes are in its appearance, however, and it locks great. Every unnecessary part of the interface has been removed. No more status bar. no more menu bar. It’s very Chrome-esque, and is perfect for a wet browser. Title bars be gone When you first launch Web, it defaults to full-screen and. as in Unity, the title bar is removed to give you the most screen space possible. It feels a bit strange at first, but on our test laptop, we quickly got used to it. Many of these interface developments have been integrated into the other new applications introduced since Gnome 3.2, including Documents and Contacts. One change that’s less visible is the introduction of document search to the Overview In the past, searching for documents in the Overview has included only recent documents, but now it uses Tracker to do a full search. This feels like a natural extension, and we can’t believe it wasn’t included in the first...

KDE 4.8 [Review]

Correct us if we’re wrong, but isn’t a point release supposed to be little more than a version with bug fixes and hardly any new features? Apparently, the KDE devs were so distracted as they continue to push the envelope of the modern desktop metaphor, that they forgot they were working on a point release, KDE 4.8 is stuffed to the brim with new features, new tools, bug fixes and performance improvements. Following the release of KDE 4.7 there were four stabilisation updates that fixed bugs and improved the performance and stability of key KDE components, such as Kontact and Nepomuk. The highlight of the previous KDE release was the improvements to Plasma Workspaces to make it suitable for portable and touchscreen devices. The KDE developers followed that up with the release of the Plasma Active interface for such devices in October, followed by an updated release in December. The KDE 4,8 release continues to improve the touchscreen experience, with bug fixes and performance tweaks to the on-screen keyboard. Other less visible updates, tweaks and bug fixes to Plasma Workspaces and the development platform show up in the taskbar and docks, with nicer context menus and improved support for launchers. The KDE guys have been working on integrating QtQuick (Qt’s Ul design language) with KDE software. It’s finally making its way into Plasma Workspaces with this release, starting with the splash screen – which is implemented using QtQuick. The first Plasma Desktop widget that switches to QtQuick, and is written purely in QML, Is the device notifier widget. It might not look all that different to the desktop user, but it’s more touch-friendly and easier to maintain for the developers. Another tool that’s written in QML, and has been improved, is the Alt-FTab window switcher. It now has six possible layouts and is suitable for systems that don’t use...

[Review] Gentoo 12

One can’t be faulted for failing to see the purpose behind a live DVD offered by a distribution which evokes fear for being a source-based distro that requires you to compile your own kernel. On the one hand is a distribution that lets you control exactly what goes into the system, and on the other is a live DVD, chock-full of applications, window managers, desktop environments and more. Gentoo 12 – a product of the Gentoo community with the Gentoo developers pitching in – is, however, unlike any other live distribution. What it is-and isn’t Although it’s based on Gentoo, you have to realise Gentoo 12 is a live DVD – not a distribution, and it certainly isn’t a milder version of Gentoo. It isn’t designed to tempt more people into adopting Gentoo, or make their Gentoo installation any easier. Unlike most other live distributions, Gentoo 12 doesn’t offer any graphical tools to help you install it to disk. At 3.6GB, the live DVD contains more software than you probably need as a regular desktop user The DVD, though, is designed to showcase the power of Linux. It includes just about all the popular tools you might need, irrespective of the kind of machine you run. Whether it’s a fancy desktop environment with delightful graphic effects, or lightweight desktops that’ll run on 128MB RAM, the DVD has it all. Keeping Linux Kernel 3.1.5 company are Gnome 3.2.1, KDE 4.7.4, XFCE 48, Fluxbox 1.3.2 and more. Gentoo 12 boots into KDE by default, but you can choose a different environment. Unlike distributions that become known by their primary supported desktop environment, Gentoo 12, despite offering so many environments and applications, doesn’t give the sense that any one was treated like the unwanted step-child. The default username is ‘gentoo’ and, oddly enough, there is no password. Spoilt for clioice The list...

Web administration console for Squid 3.2x [Review]

It is true that it is difficult to find Open Source projects that provide a real Squid Web administration interface  Here it is a real Open Source project that should provide this topic.Artica For Squid is a user-friendly Web ajax administration console that try to provide all necessaries needs in a company. Users/Categories/Web sites statistics and for several years Proxy.pac full administration. Url filtering with more than 6.500.000 categorized websites. Proxy monitoring ACLs management by UserAgents, MAC addresses. Time management bandwidth management Also there are several other features… How to use it: First You need a Free system: For examlpe Fedora, Ubuntu, Debian, Mandriva, CentOS Downlad Artica For Squid http://artica.fr/index.php/get-a-download-artica/binaries-setup-all-distris You can also download the ISO (both 32/64 bits) on SourceForge http://sourceforge.net/projects/artica-squid/files/ Support and Forum To obtain more informations and for support needs, there is a dedicated Forum: http://www.artica.fr/forum...

OpenSUSE

[OpenSUSE Links] OpenSUSE Official WEB Page OpenSUSE Community Wiki – OpenSUSE twitter – OpenSUSE  ...

Linux Mint

System Requirements for Linux Mint Installation Linux Mint 12 (Lisa) Operating System CPU (MHz) RAM (MB) HDD (MB) Video Linux Mint 12 Minimum 600 x86 or amd64 processor. The ISO you need to download depends on the processor you have. Currently Linux Mint 12 is not available for ia64. 256 5000 800×600 screen resolution Recommended 2000 x86 or amd64 dual core processor (Phenom X2 or Intel E5700 or above) 2048 10000 1024×768 A 3D capable graphics card (NVidia GeForce or ATI cards) [Linux Mint Links] Linux Mint Official WEB Page Wiki – Linux Mint  ...

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