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/etc/defaults/rc.conf (FreeBSD system start-up) [System Files]

In FreeBSD the primary start-up configuration file is /etc/defaults/rc.conf. System startup scripts such as /etc/rc and /etc/rc.d just include this file. If you want to add other programs to system startup you need to change /etc/rc.conf file instead of /etc/defaults/rc.conf. NEWER CHANGE /etc/defaults/rc.conf file! Example, if you wish to start squid proxy server, you need to do: # echo 'squid_enable=YES' >> /etc/rc.conf To start up local services, place shell scripts in the /usr/local/etc/rc.d directory. These shell scripts should be set executable, the default file mode is 555. /etc/defaults/rc.conf Here is the original FreeBSD 9 /etc/defaults/rc.conf file FreeBSD1# cat /etc/defaults/rc.conf #!/bin/sh # This is rc.conf - a file full of useful variables that you can set # to change the default startup behavior of your system. You should # not edit this file! Put any overrides into one of the ${rc_conf_files} # instead and you will be able to update these defaults later without # spamming your local configuration information. # # The ${rc_conf_files} files should only contain values which override # values set in this file. This eases the upgrade path when defaults # are changed and new features are added. # # All arguments must be in double or single quotes. # # For a more detailed explanation of all the rc.conf variables, please # refer to the rc.conf(5) manual page. # # $FreeBSD: release/9.0.0/etc/defaults/rc.conf 226786 2011-10-26 08:34:00Z mm $ ############################################################## ### Important initial Boot-time options #################### ############################################################## rc_debug="NO" # Set to YES to enable debugging output from rc.d rc_info="NO" # Enables display of informational messages at boot. rc_startmsgs="YES" # Show "Starting foo:" messages at boot rcshutdown_timeout="30" # Seconds to wait before terminating rc.shutdown early_late_divider="FILESYSTEMS" # Script that separates early/late # stages of the boot process. Make sure you know # the ramifications if you change this. # See rc.conf(5) for more details. swapfile="NO" # Set to name...

/etc/group [System Files]

/etc/group is a text file which defines the groups to which users belong under Linux and UNIX operating system. Under Unix / Linux multiple users can be categorized into groups. Unix file system permissions are organized into three classes, user, group, and others. Here is example of /etc/group file: cat /etc/group root:x:0: daemon:x:1: bin:x:2: sys:x:3: adm:x:4:username tty:x:5: disk:x:6: lp:x:7: mail:x:8: news:x:9: uucp:x:10: man:x:12: proxy:x:13: kmem:x:15: dialout:x:20:username fax:x:21: voice:x:22: cdrom:x:24:username, username1 floppy:x:25: tape:x:26: sudo:x:27: audio:x:29:pulse dip:x:30: www-data:x:33:username backup:x:34: operator:x:37: list:x:38: irc:x:39: src:x:40: gnats:x:41: shadow:x:42: utmp:x:43: video:x:44: sasl:x:45: plugdev:x:46:username staff:x:50: games:x:60: users:x:100: nogroup:x:65534: libuuid:x:101: crontab:x:102: syslog:x:103: cdrom : x : 24 : username, username1 Group : Password : Group ID (GID) : Group List Group: It is the name of group. If you run ls -l command, you will see this name printed in the group field. Password: Generally password is not used, hence it is empty/blank. It can store encrypted password. This is useful to implement privileged groups. Group ID (GID): Each user must be assigned a group ID. You can see this number in your / etc/ passwd file. Group List: It is a list of user names of users who are members of the group. The user names, must be separated by commas. To view in which group user belongs; type groups [username] Reade more about command...

/etc/services (Default Port Numbers) [System Files]

/etc/defaults/rc.conf Here is the original FreeBSD /etc/services file # /etc/services: # $Id: etcservices.txt,v 1.2 2005/12/18 13:54:31 francis Exp $ # # Network services, Internet style # # Note that it is presently the policy of IANA to assign a single well-known # port number for both TCP and UDP; hence, most entries here have two entries # even if the protocol doesn't support UDP operations. # Updated from RFC 1700, ``Assigned Numbers'' (October 1994). Not all ports # are included, only the more common ones. tcpmux 1/tcp # TCP port service multiplexer echo 7/tcp echo 7/udp discard 9/tcp sink null discard 9/udp sink null systat 11/tcp users daytime 13/tcp daytime 13/udp netstat 15/tcp qotd 17/tcp quote msp 18/tcp # message send protocol msp 18/udp # message send protocol chargen 19/tcp ttytst source chargen 19/udp ttytst source ftp-data 20/tcp ftp 21/tcp fsp 21/udp fspd ssh 22/tcp # SSH Remote Login Protocol ssh 22/udp # SSH Remote Login Protocol telnet 23/tcp # 24 - private smtp 25/tcp mail # 26 - unassigned time 37/tcp timserver time 37/udp timserver rlp 39/udp resource # resource location nameserver 42/tcp name # IEN 116 whois 43/tcp nicname re-mail-ck 50/tcp # Remote Mail Checking Protocol re-mail-ck 50/udp # Remote Mail Checking Protocol domain 53/tcp nameserver # name-domain server domain 53/udp nameserver mtp 57/tcp # deprecated bootps 67/tcp # BOOTP server bootps 67/udp bootpc 68/tcp # BOOTP client bootpc 68/udp tftp 69/udp gopher 70/tcp # Internet Gopher gopher 70/udp rje 77/tcp netrjs finger 79/tcp www 80/tcp http # WorldWideWeb HTTP www 80/udp # HyperText Transfer Protocol link 87/tcp ttylink kerberos 88/tcp kerberos5 krb5 # Kerberos v5 kerberos 88/udp kerberos5 krb5 # Kerberos v5 supdup 95/tcp # 100 - reserved hostnames 101/tcp hostname # usually from sri-nic iso-tsap 102/tcp tsap # part of ISODE. csnet-ns 105/tcp cso-ns # also used by CSO name server csnet-ns 105/udp cso-ns #...